Difference between revisions of "ICLM Journal Club"

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(This Week - 10 January 2020 (9:30 a.m., Gonda 2nd Floor Conference Room))
(This Week - 10 January 2020 (9:30 a.m., Gonda 2nd Floor Conference Room))
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=<font color="blue">'''This Week - 10 January 2020 (9:30 a.m., Gonda 2<sup>nd</sup> Floor Conference Room)'''</font>=
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=<font color="blue">'''This Week - 17 January 2020 (9:30 a.m., Gonda 2<sup>nd</sup> Floor Conference Room)'''</font>=
  
<u>Speaker:</u> ''' Cory Inman '''
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<u>Speaker:</u> ''' Carlos Portera-Cailliau '''
  
<u>Title:</u> “Modulation of Emotion and Memory via Direct Brain Stimulation in Humans: From the Laboratory into the Wild”
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<u>Title:</u> “Prefrontal Corticotectal Neurons Enhance Visual Processing through the Superior Colliculus and Pulvinar Thalamus”
  
<u>Abstract:</u> The experience of emotion shapes how our memories are formed. A key structure involved in both the experience of emotion and the prioritization of emotional experiences into memory is the amygdala. In this talk, I’ll describe recent work that demonstrates the effects of direct electrical stimulation to the human amygdala on emotional experience and long‐term declarative memory. We tested whether brief electrical stimulation to the amygdala could enhance declarative memory for specific images of neutral objects without eliciting a subjective emotional response. Epilepsy patients undergoing monitoring of seizures via intracranial depth electrodes viewed a series of neutral object images, many of which were paired with brief, low amplitude electrical stimulation to the amygdala. Amygdala stimulation elicited no subjective emotional response yet led to reliably improved memory. Neuronal oscillations in the amygdala, hippocampus, and perirhinal cortex during this next‐day memory test indicated that a neural correlate of the memory enhancement was increased theta and gamma oscillatory interactions between these regions. These results show that the amygdala can initiate endogenous memory prioritization processes in the absence of emotional input, addressing a fundamental question and opening a path to future therapies.
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<u>Abstract:</u> Top-down modulation of visual processing is mediated in part by direct prefrontal to visual cortical projections. Here, we show that the mouse cingulate cortex (Cg) regulates visual processing not only through corticocortical neurons projecting to the visual cortex but also through corticotectal neurons projecting subcortically. Bidirectional optogenetic manipulation demonstrated a prominent contribution of Cg corticotectal neurons to visually guided behavior, which is mediated by their collateral projections to both the motor-related layers of the superior colliculus (SC) and the lateral posterior nucleus of the thalamus (LP, analogous to the primate pulvinar). Whereas the Cg innervates the anterior LP (LPa), the SC innervates the posterior LP (LPp). Activating each stage of the Cg/SC/LPp or the Cg/LPa pathway strongly enhanced visual performance of the mouse and the sensory responses of visual cortical neurons. These results delineate two subcortical pathways by which a subtype of prefrontal pyramidal neurons exerts a powerful top-down influence on visual processing.
  
<u>Relevant Paper(s):</u>  
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<u>Relevant Paper(s):</u> https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0896627319307925
https://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/115/1/98.full.pdf 
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https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002839321830112X 
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='''About Us'''=
 
='''About Us'''=

Revision as of 19:26, 15 January 2020

This Week - 17 January 2020 (9:30 a.m., Gonda 2nd Floor Conference Room)

Speaker: Carlos Portera-Cailliau

Title: “Prefrontal Corticotectal Neurons Enhance Visual Processing through the Superior Colliculus and Pulvinar Thalamus”

Abstract: Top-down modulation of visual processing is mediated in part by direct prefrontal to visual cortical projections. Here, we show that the mouse cingulate cortex (Cg) regulates visual processing not only through corticocortical neurons projecting to the visual cortex but also through corticotectal neurons projecting subcortically. Bidirectional optogenetic manipulation demonstrated a prominent contribution of Cg corticotectal neurons to visually guided behavior, which is mediated by their collateral projections to both the motor-related layers of the superior colliculus (SC) and the lateral posterior nucleus of the thalamus (LP, analogous to the primate pulvinar). Whereas the Cg innervates the anterior LP (LPa), the SC innervates the posterior LP (LPp). Activating each stage of the Cg/SC/LPp or the Cg/LPa pathway strongly enhanced visual performance of the mouse and the sensory responses of visual cortical neurons. These results delineate two subcortical pathways by which a subtype of prefrontal pyramidal neurons exerts a powerful top-down influence on visual processing.

Relevant Paper(s): https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0896627319307925

About Us

Introduction

The Integrative Center for Learning and Memory (ICLM) is a multidisciplinary center of UCLA labs devoted to understanding the neural basis of learning and memory and its disorders. This will require a unified approach across different levels of analysis, including;

1. Elucidating the molecular cellular and systems mechanisms that allow neurons and synapses to undergo the long-term changes that ultimately correspond to 'neural memories'.

2. Understanding how functional dynamics and computations emerge from complex circuits of neurons, and how plasticity governs these processes.

3. Describing the neural systems in which different forms of learning and memory take place, and how these systems interact to ultimately generate behavior and cognition.

History of ICLM

The Integrative Center for Learning and Memory formally LMP started in its current form in 1998, and has served as a platform for many interactions and collaborations within UCLA. A key event organized by the group is the weekly ICLM Journal Club. For more than 10 years, graduate students, postdocs, principal investigators, and invited speakers have presented on topics ranging from the molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, through computational models of learning, to behavior and cognition. Dean Buonomano oversees the ICLM journal club with help of student/post doctoral organizers. For other events organized by ICLM go to http://www.iclm.ucla.edu/Events.html.

Current Organizers:

Shonali Dhingra

Current Faculty Advisor:

Dean Buonomano


Past Organizers:

i) Anna Matynia(Aug 2004 - Jun 2008) (Silva Lab)

ii) Robert Brown (Aug 2008 - Jun 2009) (Balleine Lab)

iii) Balaji Jayaprakash (Aug 2008 - Nov 2011) (Silva Lab)

iv) Justin Shobe & Thomas Rogerson (Dec 2011 - June 2013) (Silva Lab)

v) Walt Babiec (O'Dell Lab) (2013-2014)

vi) Walt Babiec (O'Dell Lab) & Helen Motanis (Buonomano Lab) (2014-2017)

vii) Helen Motanis (Buonomano Lab) & Shonali Dhingra (Mehta Lab) (2017-2018)

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