Difference between revisions of "ICLM Journal Club"

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=<font color="blue">'''This Week - 30 April 2021 (9:30 a.m., via Zoom)'''</font>=
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=<font color="blue">'''This Week - 07 May 2021 (9:30 a.m., via Zoom)'''</font>=
  
<u>Speaker:</u> '''Coleen T. Murphy'''
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<u>Speaker:</u> '''André Sousa'''
  
<u>Title:</u> “  Adapt or Die: Transgenerational Inheritance of Pathogen Avoidance (or, How getting food poisoning might save your species) ”
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<h4>Title:“ An inhibitory hippocampal–thalamic pathway modulates remote memory retrieval ” </h4>
  
<u>Abstract:</u>  Caenorhabditis elegans must distinguish pathogens from nutritious food sources among the many bacteria to which it is exposed in its environment1. Here we show that a single exposure to purified small RNAs isolated from pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA14) is sufficient to induce pathogen avoidance in the treated worms and in four subsequent generations of progeny. The RNA interference (RNAi) and PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathways, the germline and the ASI neuron are all required for avoidance behaviour induced by bacterial small RNAs, and for the transgenerational inheritance of this behaviour. A single P. aeruginosa non-coding RNA, P11, is both necessary and sufficient to convey learned avoidance of PA14, and its C. elegans target, maco-1, is required for avoidance. Our results suggest that this non-coding-RNA-dependent mechanism evolved to survey the microbial environment of the worm, use this information to make appropriate behavioural decisions and pass this information on to its progeny.
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<u>Abstract:</u>  Memories are supported by distributed hippocampal–thalamic–cortical networks, but the brain regions that contribute to network activity may vary with memory age. This process of reorganization is referred to as systems consolidation, and previous studies have examined the relationship between the activation of different hippocampal, thalamic, and cortical brain regions and memory age at the time of recall. While the activation of some brain regions increases with memory age, other regions become less active. In mice, here we show that the active disengagement of one such brain region, the anterodorsal thalamic nucleus, is necessary for recall at remote time-points and, in addition, which projection(s) mediate such inhibition. Specifically, we identified a sparse inhibitory projection from CA3 to the anterodorsal thalamic nucleus that becomes more active during systems consolidation, such that it is necessary for contextual fear memory retrieval at remote, but not recent, time-points post-learning.
 
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<u>Relevant Papers:</u> https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.12.28.424563v1
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https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2699-5
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https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0092867419305525
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<u>Relevant Papers:</u>https://www.nature.com/articles/s41593-021-00819-3
  
 
='''About Us'''=
 
='''About Us'''=

Revision as of 20:07, 4 May 2021

This Week - 07 May 2021 (9:30 a.m., via Zoom)

Speaker: André Sousa

Title:“ An inhibitory hippocampal–thalamic pathway modulates remote memory retrieval ”

Abstract: Memories are supported by distributed hippocampal–thalamic–cortical networks, but the brain regions that contribute to network activity may vary with memory age. This process of reorganization is referred to as systems consolidation, and previous studies have examined the relationship between the activation of different hippocampal, thalamic, and cortical brain regions and memory age at the time of recall. While the activation of some brain regions increases with memory age, other regions become less active. In mice, here we show that the active disengagement of one such brain region, the anterodorsal thalamic nucleus, is necessary for recall at remote time-points and, in addition, which projection(s) mediate such inhibition. Specifically, we identified a sparse inhibitory projection from CA3 to the anterodorsal thalamic nucleus that becomes more active during systems consolidation, such that it is necessary for contextual fear memory retrieval at remote, but not recent, time-points post-learning.

Relevant Papers:https://www.nature.com/articles/s41593-021-00819-3

About Us

Introduction

The Integrative Center for Learning and Memory (ICLM) is a multidisciplinary center of UCLA labs devoted to understanding the neural basis of learning and memory and its disorders. This will require a unified approach across different levels of analysis, including;

1. Elucidating the molecular cellular and systems mechanisms that allow neurons and synapses to undergo the long-term changes that ultimately correspond to 'neural memories'.

2. Understanding how functional dynamics and computations emerge from complex circuits of neurons, and how plasticity governs these processes.

3. Describing the neural systems in which different forms of learning and memory take place, and how these systems interact to ultimately generate behavior and cognition.

History of ICLM

The Integrative Center for Learning and Memory formally LMP started in its current form in 1998, and has served as a platform for many interactions and collaborations within UCLA. A key event organized by the group is the weekly ICLM Journal Club. For more than 10 years, graduate students, postdocs, principal investigators, and invited speakers have presented on topics ranging from the molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, through computational models of learning, to behavior and cognition. Dean Buonomano oversees the ICLM journal club with help of student/post doctoral organizers. For other events organized by ICLM go to http://www.iclm.ucla.edu/Events.html.

Current Organizers:

Megha Sehgal (Silva Lab) & Giselle Fernandes (Silva Lab). Please email us at iclm.journalclub@gmail.com if you would like to get regular updates regarding our journal club and weekly reminders.

Current Faculty Advisor:

Dean Buonomano


Past Organizers:

i) Anna Matynia(Aug 2004 - Jun 2008) (Silva Lab)

ii) Robert Brown (Aug 2008 - Jun 2009) (Balleine Lab)

iii) Balaji Jayaprakash (Aug 2008 - Nov 2011) (Silva Lab)

iv) Justin Shobe & Thomas Rogerson (Dec 2011 - June 2013) (Silva Lab)

v) Walt Babiec (O'Dell Lab) (2013-2014)

vi) Walt Babiec (O'Dell Lab) & Helen Motanis (Buonomano Lab) (2014-2017)

vii) Helen Motanis (Buonomano Lab) & Shonali Dhingra (Mehta Lab) (2017-2018)

viii) Shonali Dhingra (Mehta Lab) (2018-2020)

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