Difference between revisions of "ICLM Journal Club"

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(This Week - 18 February 2022 (9:30 a.m., via Zoom))
(This Week - 11 March 2022 (9:30 a.m., via Zoom))
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=<font color="blue">'''This Week - 11 March 2022 (9:30 a.m., via Zoom)'''</font>=
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=<font color="blue">'''This Week - 18 March 2022 (9:30 a.m., via Zoom)'''</font>=
  
<u>Speaker:</u> '''Ayal Lavi '''
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<u>Speaker:</u> '''Zachary Zeidler '''
  
<u>Title: </u> ''' “ A retrograde mechanism coordinates recruitment of memory ensembles across brain regions. ” '''
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<u>Title: </u> ''' “ Memory organization in the amygdala across time and re-exposure. ” '''
  
<u>Summary:</u> Memories are stored in ensembles of neurons in different brain regions. However, it is unclear whether and how the allocation of a memory to these ensembles is coordinated across brain regions. To address this question, we developed a novel approach that uses CREB expression to bias memory allocation in one brain region, and rabies retrograde tracing to study memory allocation in connected presynaptic neurons in other brain regions. Together with mathematical simulations, this approach revealed a universal retrograde mechanism that coordinates the recruitment of memory ensembles across cortical and subcortical regions, and in multiple behavioral paradigms, including conditioned taste aversion and auditory fear conditioning. We leveraged this retrograde mechanism to increase memory ensemble connectivity between brain regions, and show that this enhanced memory. These results uncovered a novel retrograde mechanism that coordinates the recruitment of memory ensembles across brain regions, and demonstrate its importance for memory formation.
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<u>Summary:</u> I will discuss and synthesize two recent papers examining amygdalar activity during fear memory across time and memory re-exposure. The papers emphasize different aspects of amygdala dynamics. One paper (Liu...Maren Jan 2022 Biol Psych) focuses on overlap in activity representing both recent and remote memory. The other (Cho...Han Dec 2021 Curr Bio) emphasizes turnover in amygdalar ensembles following memory re-exposure. Together, they show the persistent yet dynamic activity of amygdalar ensembles in fear memory
  
<u>Relevant papers:</u>  https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.10.28.466361v1
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<u>Relevant papers:</u>  
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  1) Liu, J., Totty, M. S., Melissari, L., Bayer, H. & Maren, S. Convergent coding of recent and remote fear memory in the basolateral amygdala. Biol Psychiat (2022) doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2021.12.018.
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2) Cho, H.-Y. et al. Turnover of fear engram cells by repeated experience. Curr Biol (2021) doi:10.1016/j.cub.2021.10.004.
  
 
='''About Us'''=
 
='''About Us'''=

Revision as of 00:53, 16 March 2022

This Week - 18 March 2022 (9:30 a.m., via Zoom)

Speaker: Zachary Zeidler

Title: “ Memory organization in the amygdala across time and re-exposure. ”

Summary: I will discuss and synthesize two recent papers examining amygdalar activity during fear memory across time and memory re-exposure. The papers emphasize different aspects of amygdala dynamics. One paper (Liu...Maren Jan 2022 Biol Psych) focuses on overlap in activity representing both recent and remote memory. The other (Cho...Han Dec 2021 Curr Bio) emphasizes turnover in amygdalar ensembles following memory re-exposure. Together, they show the persistent yet dynamic activity of amygdalar ensembles in fear memory

Relevant papers:

1) Liu, J., Totty, M. S., Melissari, L., Bayer, H. & Maren, S. Convergent coding of recent and remote fear memory in the basolateral amygdala. Biol Psychiat (2022) doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2021.12.018.

2) Cho, H.-Y. et al. Turnover of fear engram cells by repeated experience. Curr Biol (2021) doi:10.1016/j.cub.2021.10.004.

About Us

Introduction

The Integrative Center for Learning and Memory (ICLM) is a multidisciplinary center of UCLA labs devoted to understanding the neural basis of learning and memory and its disorders. This will require a unified approach across different levels of analysis, including;

1. Elucidating the molecular cellular and systems mechanisms that allow neurons and synapses to undergo the long-term changes that ultimately correspond to 'neural memories'.

2. Understanding how functional dynamics and computations emerge from complex circuits of neurons, and how plasticity governs these processes.

3. Describing the neural systems in which different forms of learning and memory take place, and how these systems interact to ultimately generate behavior and cognition.

History of ICLM

The Integrative Center for Learning and Memory formally LMP started in its current form in 1998, and has served as a platform for many interactions and collaborations within UCLA. A key event organized by the group is the weekly ICLM Journal Club. For more than 10 years, graduate students, postdocs, principal investigators, and invited speakers have presented on topics ranging from the molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, through computational models of learning, to behavior and cognition. Dean Buonomano oversees the ICLM journal club with help of student/post doctoral organizers. For other events organized by ICLM go to http://www.iclm.ucla.edu/Events.html.

Current Organizers:

Megha Sehgal (Silva Lab) & Giselle Fernandes (Silva Lab). Please email us at iclm.journalclub@gmail.com if you would like to get regular updates regarding our journal club and weekly reminders.

Current Faculty Advisor:

Dean Buonomano


Past Organizers:

i) Anna Matynia(Aug 2004 - Jun 2008) (Silva Lab)

ii) Robert Brown (Aug 2008 - Jun 2009) (Balleine Lab)

iii) Balaji Jayaprakash (Aug 2008 - Nov 2011) (Silva Lab)

iv) Justin Shobe & Thomas Rogerson (Dec 2011 - June 2013) (Silva Lab)

v) Walt Babiec (O'Dell Lab) (2013-2014)

vi) Walt Babiec (O'Dell Lab) & Helen Motanis (Buonomano Lab) (2014-2017)

vii) Helen Motanis (Buonomano Lab) & Shonali Dhingra (Mehta Lab) (2017-2018)

viii) Shonali Dhingra (Mehta Lab) (2018-2020)

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